Symposium Brings Decision Makers Together

The 25th annual Symposium on Kentucky’s Children Who Are Gifted and Talented brought together nearly 50 superintendents, school board members, gifted education coordinators, and experts to discuss gifted education in the commonwealth. Attendees discussed things that have worked well in their districts and brainstormed ways to improve gifted education offerings while hearing from a variety of speakers and panels. Held at the Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill, the Symposium is hosted each year by the Kentucky Advisory Council for Gifted and Talented Education and the Kentucky Association for Gifted Education. Julia Roberts, the executive director of The Center for Gifted Studies, and other staff from The Center helped facilitate the event.

Lynn Ashbrook, director of gifted education programs for Pulaski County Schools and Pulaski County Superintendent Steve Butcher laugh while participating in a panel discussion during the Symposium October 13.
Lynn Ashbrook, director of gifted education programs for Pulaski County Schools and Pulaski County Superintendent Steve Butcher laugh while participating in a panel discussion during the Symposium October 13.
Rhonda Sims, the associate commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Education's Office of Assessment and Accountability, speaks during the Symposium October 13.
Rhonda Sims, the associate commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Education’s Office of Assessment and Accountability, speaks during the Symposium October 13.
Bullitt County Superintendent Keith Davis discusses initiatives he began for gifted students in his district after attending his first Symposium several years earlier. Davis will receive the National Association for Gifted Children's Administrator Award in November.
Bullitt County Superintendent Keith Davis discusses initiatives he began for gifted students in his district after attending his first Symposium several years earlier. Davis will receive the National Association for Gifted Children’s Administrator Award in November.
Carol Horn, coordinator of advanced academics for Fairfax, Virginia, County Schools, speaks about her district's Young Scholars program October 13 during the Symposium. A similar program will be implemented in Jefferson County through a federal Javits grant that is a partnership between The Center for Gifted Studies, Jefferson County Schools, the University of Louisville and the Kentucky Department of Education.
Carol Horn, coordinator of advanced academics for Fairfax, Virginia, County Schools, speaks about her district’s Young Scholars program October 13 during the Symposium. A similar program will be implemented in Jefferson County through a federal Javits grant that is a partnership between The Center for Gifted Studies, Jefferson County Schools, the University of Louisville and the Kentucky Department of Education.
Leann Pickerill, the program consultant for gifted and talented education in the Kentucky Department of Education, discusses common barriers to gifted education with a group of Symposium participants October 14.
Leann Pickerill, the program consultant for gifted and talented education in the Kentucky Department of Education, discusses common barriers to gifted education with a group of Symposium participants October 14.
Julia Roberts speaks about the excellence gap October 13 during the Symposium. The excellence gap refers to the disparity in the percent of lower-income versus higher-income students who reach advanced levels of academic performance.
Julia Roberts speaks about the excellence gap October 13 during the Symposium. The excellence gap refers to the disparity in the percent of lower-income versus higher-income students who reach advanced levels of academic performance.
Fulton County Superintendent Aaron Collins brainstorms possible funding sources for gifted education with a group of Symposium attendees October 14.
Fulton County Superintendent Aaron Collins brainstorms possible funding sources for gifted education with a group of Symposium attendees October 14.
Students from The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky participate in a panel discussion about gifted education October 13 during the Symposium.
Students from The Carol Martin Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky participate in a panel discussion about gifted education October 13 during the Symposium.
Panelists Lynn Ashbrook, director of gifted education programs for Pulaski County Schools (from left);Pulaski County Superintendent Steve Butcher; Breckinridge County Superintendent Janet Meeks; and Tom Shelton, executive director of the Kentucky Association of School Superintendents participate in a discussion October 13 during the Symposium.
Panelists Lynn Ashbrook, director of gifted education programs for Pulaski County Schools (from left);Pulaski County Superintendent Steve Butcher; Breckinridge County Superintendent Janet Meeks; and Tom Shelton, executive director of the Kentucky Association of School Superintendents participate in a discussion October 13 during the Symposium.
Symposium attendees discuss possible ways to increase funding for gifted education October 14.
Symposium attendees discuss possible ways to increase funding for gifted education October 14.
Symposium participants discuss common barriers to gifted education in small groups October 14.
Symposium participants discuss common barriers to gifted education in small groups October 14.
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