Science teachers engage in hands-on opportunities

By Sam Oldenburg and Tucker Covey

Ten middle school science teachers from across the United States engaged in a variety of hands-on lessons throughout the week as the inaugural class of National Stem Cell Foundation Scholars. The teachers were selected for the prestigious program through a competitive application process and able to attend at no cost thanks to a grant from the National Stem Cell Foundation. The teachers will return to their schools with a variety of ideas, lessons, and resources then reconvene in Washington, DC, in the winter to discuss their progress on individual challenge projects they will implement in their classrooms before returning to WKU next summer to share with the next class of NSCF Scholars.

Guest speaker Chris Graney points out constellations and planets to the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. Chris is a professor of astronomy and physics at Jefferson Community and Technical College in Louisville. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Guest speaker Chris Graney points out constellations and planets to the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. Chris is a professor of astronomy and physics at Jefferson Community and Technical College in Louisville. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, drills a hole while building a tablet microscope stand with instruction from Rico Tyler, a SkyTeach master teacher, Monday, June 6. The NSCF Scholars constructed a variety of scientific instruments throughout the week that they will ship home to use in their classrooms. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, drills a hole while building a tablet microscope stand with instruction from Rico Tyler, a SkyTeach master teacher, Monday, June 6. The NSCF Scholars constructed a variety of scientific instruments throughout the week that they will ship home to use in their classrooms. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Anneliese Bopp from Sodus Intermediate School in Sodus, New York, attaches the foam nosepiece to her rocket while visiting with a fellow NSCF Scholar Tuesday, June 7. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Anneliese Bopp from Sodus Intermediate School in Sodus, New York, attaches the foam nosepiece to her rocket while visiting with a fellow NSCF Scholar Tuesday, June 7. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Marie Gillespie from Pierre Indian Learning Center in Pierre, South Dakota, examines sea salt using a smartphone microscope she built Monday, June 6, during the NSCF Scholars program. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Marie Gillespie from Pierre Indian Learning Center in Pierre, South Dakota, examines sea salt using a smartphone microscope she built Monday, June 6, during the NSCF Scholars program. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah (left) from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, and Maggie Huddleston from Sand Ridge Junior High School in Roy, Utah, examine cooking spices using a tablet microscope stand Monday, June 6. The NSCF Scholars later built their own stands to bring back to their schools. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah (left) from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, and Maggie Huddleston from Sand Ridge Junior High School in Roy, Utah, examine cooking spices using a tablet microscope stand Monday, June 6. The NSCF Scholars later built their own stands to bring back to their schools. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Bruce Boehne (left) from Zion Lutheran School in Dallas, Texas, and Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, lower a wave machine over the balcony in Gary Ransdell Hall Wednesday, June 8. The NSCF Scholars each built their own wave machines then attached several to make a large wave machine. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Bruce Boehne (left) from Zion Lutheran School in Dallas, Texas, and Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, lower a wave machine over the balcony in Gary Ransdell Hall Wednesday, June 8. The NSCF Scholars each built their own wave machines then attached several to make a large wave machine. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Stacy Clark-Thomas from Ben Eielson Junior/Senior High School on Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska positions her rocket on the air compressor-powered launcher with help from Rico Tyler, a SKyTeach master teacher, Tuesday, June 7. Rico has taught the NSCF Scholars physical science activities each morning. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Stacy Clark-Thomas from Ben Eielson Junior/Senior High School on Eielson Air Force Base in Alaska positions her rocket on the air compressor-powered launcher with help from Rico Tyler, a SKyTeach master teacher, Tuesday, June 7. Rico has taught the NSCF Scholars physical science activities each morning. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, watches his rocket rise Tuesday, June 7. The NSCF Scholars recorded the rocket flight times to determine which flew highest. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, watches his rocket rise Tuesday, June 7. The NSCF Scholars recorded the rocket flight times to determine which flew highest. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Bruce Boehne from Zion Lutheran School in Dallas, Texas, sends a wave down the wave machine constructed by the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Bruce Boehne from Zion Lutheran School in Dallas, Texas, sends a wave down the wave machine constructed by the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Jill Henry (left) from Herrick Middle School in Downers Grove, Illinois, and Melissa Harris from Warren East Middle in Bowling Green create a hypothesis cube Monday, June 6. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
Jill Henry (left) from Herrick Middle School in Downers Grove, Illinois, and Melissa Harris from Warren East Middle in Bowling Green create a hypothesis cube Monday, June 6. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
Maggie Huddleston (left) of Roy, Utah, andSKyTeach Master Instructor Rico Tyler demonstrate through dance how the moon orbits around Earth Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Tucker Covey)
Maggie Huddleston (left) of Roy, Utah, andSKyTeach Master Instructor Rico Tyler demonstrate through dance how the moon orbits around Earth Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Tucker Covey)
Amy Long from Sanford Middle School in Opeika, Alabama, sends a wave up the wave machine constructed by the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Amy Long from Sanford Middle School in Opeika, Alabama, sends a wave up the wave machine constructed by the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
SKyTeach Master Teacher Rico Tyler helps NSCF Scholars Melissa Harris (left) of Warren East Middle School in Bowling Green and Amy Long from Sanford Middle School in Opeika, Alabama, take a picture of the moon using their smartphones and a telescope Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
SKyTeach Master Teacher Rico Tyler helps NSCF Scholars Melissa Harris (left) of Warren East Middle School in Bowling Green and Amy Long from Sanford Middle School in Opeika, Alabama, take a picture of the moon using their smartphones and a telescope Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Jill Henry from Herrick Middle School in Downers Grove, Illinois, attaches foam fins to her rocket Tuesday, June 7. The NSCF Scholars built rockets using paper, tape, and foam. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Jill Henry from Herrick Middle School in Downers Grove, Illinois, attaches foam fins to her rocket Tuesday, June 7. The NSCF Scholars built rockets using paper, tape, and foam. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Rico Tyler (from left) gets assistance creating his wave machine from NSCF Scholars Bruce Boehne, Jill Henry, and Amy Long on Wednesday, June 8. The wave machine can be used as a physical representation of amplitude and also as a double helix model. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
Rico Tyler (from left) gets assistance creating his wave machine from NSCF Scholars Bruce Boehne, Jill Henry, and Amy Long on Wednesday, June 8. The wave machine can be used as a physical representation of amplitude and also as a double helix model. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
National Stem Cell Foundation Scholar Bruce Boehne (left) from Zion Lutheran School in Dallas, Texas, prepares to launch his rocket using compressed air with help from SKyTeach Master Teacher Rico Tyler on Tuesday, June 7. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
National Stem Cell Foundation Scholar Bruce Boehne (left) from Zion Lutheran School in Dallas, Texas, prepares to launch his rocket using compressed air with help from SKyTeach Master Teacher Rico Tyler on Tuesday, June 7. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
National Stem Cell Foundation Board Chair Paula Grisanti discusses advancements in regenerative medicine, including research funded by NSCF, with the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. The organization provided funding for ten middle school science teachers to participate in the inaugural NSCF Scholars program this year. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
National Stem Cell Foundation Board Chair Paula Grisanti discusses advancements in regenerative medicine, including research funded by NSCF, with the NSCF Scholars Wednesday, June 8. The organization provided funding for ten middle school science teachers to participate in the inaugural NSCF Scholars program this year. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
SKyTeach Master Teacher Rico Tyler demonstrates how floating on the back in water is possible Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
SKyTeach Master Teacher Rico Tyler demonstrates how floating on the back in water is possible Wednesday, June 8. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, attaches foam fins to his rocket while Melissa Harris of Warren East Middle School in Bowling Green waits to use the hot glue gun Tuesday, June 7. The simple rockets took about thirty minutes to construct. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Santosh Zachariah from the Evergreen School in Shoreline, Washington, attaches foam fins to his rocket while Melissa Harris of Warren East Middle School in Bowling Green waits to use the hot glue gun Tuesday, June 7. The simple rockets took about thirty minutes to construct. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Melissa Harris (from left), Stacy Clark-Thomas, Amy Long, Marie Gillespie, and Bruce Boehne examine cooking spices using an iPad and a tablet microscope stand Monday, June 6. The sample lesson involved examining individual spices before examining a chicken rub to determine what it was composed of. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
Melissa Harris (from left), Stacy Clark-Thomas, Amy Long, Marie Gillespie, and Bruce Boehne examine cooking spices using an iPad and a tablet microscope stand Monday, June 6. The sample lesson involved examining individual spices before examining a chicken rub to determine what it was composed of. (Photo by Sam Oldenburg)
WKU biology professor Kerrie McDaniel demonstrates the usefulness of a double helix model made using classroom materials to the National Stem Cell Foundation Scholars on Wednesday, June 8. Kerrie shared life science lessons each afternoon. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
WKU biology professor Kerrie McDaniel demonstrates the usefulness of a double helix model made using classroom materials to the National Stem Cell Foundation Scholars on Wednesday, June 8. Kerrie shared life science lessons each afternoon. (Photo by Tucker Allen Covey)
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